London Marathon celebrated its first anniversary 39 years ago

March 29, 1981 marked a historic milestone for the London Marathon, one of the six most prestigious marathon runs on the planet. Today, millions of long-distance lovers love to celebrate the 39th anniversary of this special run.

This day just 39 years ago, the London Marathon officially opened with the participation of 7,055 athletes. The starting line, located at Greenwich Park, has become one of the most distinctive features of the prestigious run of nearly four decades.

The 1981 London Marathon was founded by Olympic journalist and Chris Brasher and athlete John Disley. Shortly after attending the New York City Marathon in November 1979, Brasher wrote an article in The Observer and was inspired here to propose the London Marathon.

In its first year of organization, the London Marathon took place on March 29, 1981, with over 20,000 registered users, but only over 7,000 were accepted. The record for that year was 6,255 who completed the race with a finish line set at Constitution Hill.

Over the years, the London Marathon has become one of the six most prestigious marathons (World Marathon Majors) with rapid growth. As of 2009, 746,635 people had completed the race. In 2010, 36,549 were awarded a medal for completion.

In 1983, wheelchair content was first introduced to the competition to create fairness for disabled athletes. In 2013, the IPC Athletics Marathon World Cup was held together with the London Marathon.

This year, the London Marathon was jubilantly celebrating its 40th anniversary on April 26, 2020, but the outbreak of the COVID-19 epidemic caused the race to delay until October 4, 2020. This promises to be one of the most worth watching events on the planet with the two best marathon runners in the world today: Eliud Kipchoge, the Kenyan star holding the world record (2:01: 39), was the first person in the world to run 42.195km under 2 hours and was also the reigning champion of the London Marathon when last year came in first with a record of 2: 2: 37 (fourth crowned).

The opponent of the “Goat” will be Kenenisa Bekele, the Ethiopian runner holding the second fastest marathon record in history: 2:01:41 at the Berlin Marathon 2019 (only less than Eliud Kipchoge’s world record of 2) seconds). Bekele also holds the world and Olympic records for the 5000m and 10,000 men’s distances.