School sports in America are among the strongest in the world. However, statistics show that the number of children aged 6 to 12 years competing in the country has dropped by nearly 8% in the last decade.

School sports in America are among the strongest in the world. But a new study published last week by the American Association of Sports and Fitness Industry and the Aspen Research Institute shows a pessimistic signal. The number of children aged 6 to 12 competing has dropped nearly 8% in the past decade, according to The Washington Post.

According to the above statistics, in 2008 nearly 45% of children (6 to 12 years old) played on a regular sports team. This year, this figure is only 37%. That’s one of the three ominous trends for young sports in the US: fewer people join, rising costs and poor coaches.

USA Today newspaper last week led the case of the couple Judy Carter and Dwight Davis to see that, students who want to play sports well, the cost is not small.

Mr. and Mrs. Davis recently flew from the US to Scotland, which is said to be the home of golf. The couple spent a total of $4,800 for 10 days following the progress of their son Ian Davis – turning 14 in August. He participated in the European golf championship for American children – U.S. Kids Golf European Championship 2017 – and finished in 32nd when competing at the age of 13.

Davis and his wife had high expectations for Ian Davis to play the game at the age of 7, and Mr. Dwight estimated that the investment for his children should be at six digits. Davis – now a vice president of a global information technology company – admits to sacrificing a lot, such as not traveling a lot and withdrawing about $400,000 in his retirement fund.

Recently, they sold their house in Dallas to move to live in Orlando, Florida. This is a way to help Ian improve skills at Bishops Gate Golf Academy, where tuition is about 60,000 USD.

The Davis story typical of the expensive cost to develop athletic ability.